Random Thursday

Scattershooting while taking a break from what is nowadays my morning ritual: sweeping the sand left by the previous day's windstorm from our driveway. (At least this morning I didn't have to break out the shovel, as I did on Monday.)

  • Doing our part to stimulate the economy, we immediately spent our tax refund (and then some) on new bedroom furniture. We didn't need new furniture, but realizing that our old furniture was purchased in 1981 made it seem somewhat more justifiable.

    Anyway, we now have a spare set of bedroom furniture (and a media center/armoire that's a bit newer), and we figure we might as well try to sell it, giving us the chance to spend some additional money before finally giving up and donating it. And, of course, I immediately latched onto the idea of doing a website for the task. Interestingly, I was able to secure a unique domain name for a year, and a hosting account for one month, for the total sum of $8.06. Amazing.

    If you're interested in seeing the furniture, you can visit the site.

  • This graph has been showing up in various places across the web, but in case you haven't seen it, it demonstrates the zeal with which Canadians follow their beloved sport of hockey. I think this phenomenon has also occurred during recent Super Bowls, except in inverse fashion, as people stay glued to the TV during commercial breaks, and use the game time to take care of, um, other business.

  • And speaking of graphs, where was this when I needed it during Mrs. Hayter's trig class in high school? This is an inverse graphing calculator, and it generates a series of equations that, when graphed, result in the phrase that you type into the form. We did this back in the day in said trigonometry class, drawing by hand a simple illustration, and then producing the equations that would map it out on graph paper. I still remember mine: a train locomotive. And I couldn't graph it today if my life, and those of everyone I know, and everyone I don't know, depended on it.

  • And speaking of lives depending on something else, if you're a bicyclist in Midland and want to use Google's new bike route maps, be forewarned that doing so could be hazardous to your health. I just tried mapping a route from northwest Midland to downtown, and Google's recommendation advises the cyclist to ride down the Andrews Highway, one of the busiest and least bike-friendly roads in the city. Google's new offering obviously wasn't designed with West Texas in mind (or vice versa).

  • And speaking of design (yeah, I'm stretching here), here are some beautiful examples of creativity, combining art with typography. Margaret Shepherd is a calligrapher who has discovered that a letter or word can do double duty.

  • Ending on a more serious note, Roger L. Simon questions why a couple of noted commentators are refusing to support Geert Wilders, the Dutch politician now on trial for "hate speech." I don't take seriously anything Glenn Beck says, but Charles Krauthammer is a different story, and the implications of mistakenly assuming that Islam and Islamism have little or nothing in common seems to me to be a mistake with deadly consequences. Krauthammer should know better.

4 Comments

Oooo. We've got the same cherry armoire. We'll sell it for half your lowest offer (and throw in a 27" tube teevee). Or, we'll sell the tube teevee for the recycling cost and throw in the armoire, free. (If the buyer'll come pick it up. The armoire weighs more than your typical cross-over SUV.)

The best of the calligraphy art (IMHO) is the series at the end of that post. Or maybe it's just me because I have another grandchild due in a few weeks.

(And, the MT signin thingie wasn't working for me today, as it doesn't on most of the blogs that use most of the time. Yours had been the exception until today.)

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This page contains a single entry by Eric published on March 11, 2010 8:30 AM.

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